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Found 36 results

  1. Castlevania Collection Wheel View File The Castlevania Collection wheel. Inside is a Database, and wheel Images for a Castlevania wheel. There is a bunch of @KlopjerO theme's you can pick up in the download section already created. There's also a set LaunchBox theme's for this wheel in their download section. It doesn't take long to fill in the video files from your existing folder's and should have most of the games here. The main menu theme I made is not in the pack as it was rushed and crappy quality, maybe someone will post a new one. With all the existing work out there these wheels are quick and easy to put together. Credits to various Hyperspin Media creators for the Wheel png's, I didn't make any of them. Your welcome to edit and re-share this pack if you would like to see improvement or fill in anything I've missed. enjoy Submitter Dubbloseven Submitted 05/20/2017 Category Wheel Packs HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  2. Sharp X68000 - Akumajou Dracula (1993)(Konami)-klopjero(20170417) View File Castlevania Chronicles, released in Japan as Castlevania Chronicle: Akumajō Dracula (悪魔城年代記キャッスルヴァニアクロニクル 悪魔城ドラキュラ Kyassuruvania Kuronikuru Akumajō Dorakyura?), is a platform video game developed by Konami for the PlayStation.[1] It is a port of a game originally released for the Sharp X68000 home computer in 1993 as simply Akumajō Dracula (悪魔城ドラキュラ Akumajō Dorakyura?, "Devil's Castle Dracula").[2] This Castlevania Chronicles port adds a number of features, including an Arranged Mode for new players.[3][4] Much like Super Castlevania IV, Castlevania Chronicles is positioned as a remake of the original Castlevania for the Nintendo Entertainment System, where the vampire hunter Simon Belmont must defeat Dracula and save Transylvania. It was made available for download via the PlayStation Network as a PSone Classic on December 18, 2008. Comparison of Castlevania Chonicles and akumajou dracula for x68000 written up by Ray hardgrit Akumajō Dracula (X68000) Another Castlevania game with the Japanese title Akumajou Dracula, retelling the story of Simon Belmont's epic struggle through Castlevania 1. So that's... five of them now, right? For years this was only available in Japan for the Sharp X68000 computer, but it finally got a western release in 2001 on the PlayStation, under the name Castlevania Chronicles. Team Evil conspire to resurrect their dark lord, Dracula. And apparently succeed. Fortunately Simon Belmont is onto their sinister scheme, and heads inside Dracula's castle to put him right back into his coffin. Again. Though this is definitely the most dramatic of the 'Simon stands in front of a castle' prologues. Instead of the castle being a sinister silhouette in the distance, this time it towers over our hero. Simon doesn't care though, he just whips his Vampire Killer whip and strolls instead. Count Dracula's front garden seems more colourful than last time I was here. But otherwise this seems just how it was in Castlevania 1. It's even playing Vampire Killer, the stage one music from the NES game. Castlevania (NES) There's the nasty looking trees, the statue, the fence along the back and the fires I smash open to get heart ammo for my sub-weapons. Even the HUD is the same. Hey, it's these guys again, racing to die by a single crack of my whip. Castlevania (NES) You know, of all the retellings of Castlevania I've played so far, this is definitely the closest to the original. Annoyingly Simon is also glued back to stairs again. In Super Castlevania IV I could hop on to stairs, and drop down from them, but in this I'm locked onto them until I reach the top or bottom. And he walks up them painfully slowly. He doesn't have Super Castlevania IV's awesome multi-directional whip attack either. Plus he can't walk while crouching. He CAN move in the air while jumping though, which seems a weird thing to change if you're keeping everything else the same, but I'm definitely not complaining. Castlevania Chronicles (PSX) The PlayStation version of the game is pretty much identical as far as I can tell. But it does come with 'Arrange Mode', which changes the graphics a bit, adds some effects like glowing candles, and swaps out the music with a new soundtrack. Weirdly it also changes Simon's hair pink, and to be honest I don't think it suits him. The Evolution of Simon I think that's all the Simon Belmonts now, including blue haired Giant Simon from the first arcade game. I think this game might actually have the most authentic looking Simon out of all of them, assuming the box art to the first game is what he's supposed to look like. Whoa, I don't remember seeing that in the NES version. Castlevania (NES) One good thing about this being a remake, is that I already know where some of the health pickups will be hidden. Well, the wall broke... but there's nothing in here. That's pretty cruel of them I reckon. OH SHIT WHAT THE FUCK! I've opened the floodgates and now infinite hunchbacks are pouring in. SOON. Well the good news is that I've found where Dracula hid his lunch. The bad news is that if I stop whipping and go to grab it I'll be swarmed by enemies. Aw fuck it, I'm grabbing the meal and making a run for the stairs. Oh, it's this guy again. Fortunately I remembered to bring along plenty of axes. Castlevania (NES) If I remember right, the strategy for this guy is to grab the 'II' power up from this brick, then use it to throw two axes at a time up at him. Oh crap, the first hit turned him into a homing swarm of bats. It seems that I have to wait for the swarm to dive at me, then run out of the way. The new improved bat boss wasn't so bad. Huh, didn't the map used to go up at this point? Castlevania (NES) It seems like I'm going through an entirely different route from now on. I guess they got bored with remaking Castlevania. Castlevania Chronicles (PSX) The Castlevania Chronicles Arrange Mode version of of the map has been totally redrawn for whatever reason. Personally I through it looked fine the first time, but this is good too. I have no idea why they thought that making me slowly hack through walls of slime would be a good idea. Hitting things is often fun, but not when I have to slowly chip away at series of walls for no reason. Hey, the water didn't instantly kill him, that's always g.... oh SHIT there's an enemy behind me! These games have been pretty good so far with making enemies stand out, but these guys always look like they're in the background to me. It doesn't help that they often are in the background, flying past. Hey these two areas kind of look the same... nah I'm stretching. Except for the raft and the water this is pretty much a completely different area to anything in the NES game. Though ducking is still recommended. SOON. Well... fuck. This raft used to be much bigger than this, but water is flooding this cavern and as the raft goes up, it hits pieces of the background and splits apart. And tilts. And these mermen keep jumping up and spitting fireballs at me, which will be an instant kill at this point seeing as I've got nowhere to land but water if I'm hit. And if I get killed I'll be put back all the way at bottom again. Oh shit oh shit, what just happened? I think my raft got stuck on something so I have to jump up and reach the next one. This wouldn't even be a problem if Simon would just learn to swim. Oh shit, now I have to fight a boss? This game is an asshole! I bet if this guy kills me I'm going to be put back all the way down at the bottom again, though I'm not keen to test that theory. Because I got killed earlier I'm back to using the crappy non-upgraded starting whip, so this may take a while. Stage 7! Though it feels more like I should be up to stage 15 by now. These bug things are really starting to annoy be because of how long they take to kill. Plus every time I wander too close to a tree I get attacked by one of those tree monsters I haven't seen since Haunted Castle. But damn those are some nice looking trees. Sorry Super Castlevania IV, you look pretty good but right now this game looks better. What the FUCK? The birds have teamed up with the hunchbacks! Castlevania (NES) To be fair this bit actually is in the original Castlevania game. Actually there's nothing fair about this! Hunchbacks and birds teaming up... they're bad enough separately. I ran away from the hunchbacks, but I didn't get far. I got swarmed by evil droplets of water. Not really much of a heroic death for poor Simon. I'll continue and try to give him a better one. That's pretty cool, how the arrows stick in him. Though they're big enough to be javelins really. I made it out of that second with pretty much zero health, I did terrible. But I did manage to grab this strange plant sub-weapon. Which actually turned out to be a healing item. This thing uses up hearts to give me back health. Which means I actually have a chance of getting somewhere now. I'm pretty sure this thing wasn't in the original Castlevania. In fact I don't think any of this was, we're back in uncharted territory. Like all the other retellings of Simon's fight with Dracula, this is pretty much it's own game. Stage 9 is a slippery slidey ice stage. Great. I was stuck for a while trying to figure out how to get through this wall, but it seems that the game got bored waiting for me to try attacking the floor instead, and smashed it for me. Hey, I recognise that guy! Oh shit shit shit, no! I just collected a bloody dagger sub-weapon by accident. Now I've lost my ultra rare healing plant. LATER. It turns out it probably didn't matter what I had equipped, because this guy seems to be knocking the power ups right out of me. No, don't bring the monster out! Come back and give me something I can hit you son of a bitch. I don't have time to fuck around here. I really don't! I have 12 seconds left to finish this fight, and it's all being wasted because this guy keeps sending this creature out to fight for him. The time counter reaches 000 and Simon keels over. I could have won that battle too. BACK AT THE START OF THE STAGE. Oh crap! I didn't realise this pillar moved up so fast. I was lucky first time around and jumped off immediately. This time though it's an instant kill. Back to the start. It's kinda hard to jump over a pit on a slidey ice stage when the floor slopes towards it. I guess I must have been lucky first time I managed this too. And then Simon Belmont joins the other falling heroes decorating the level because there's no way I'm going to continue from all the way back at stage 7... with those bloody hunchbacks and birds. The game has infinite continues and uses saves instead of passwords, so it's probably on the right side of winnable. But it feels like a step backwards after Super Castlevania IV... backwards into an insta-kill pit. The gameplay is solid, and it's not as ridiculously challenging as Haunted Castle (yet), but really don't want to go back and try all that again. So it doesn't get a gold star. Submitter klopjero Submitted 04/17/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  3. Nintendo DS - Castlevania - Dawn of Sorrow (USA)-klopjero(20170406) View File Nintendo DS - Castlevania - Dawn of Sorrow (USA)-klopjero(20170406) Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow, known in Japan as Akumajō Dracula: Sōgetsu no Jūjika (悪魔城ドラキュラ 蒼月の十字架?, literally Devil's Castle Dracula: Cross of the Blue Moon),[2] is an action-adventure game developed and published by Konami. It is part of Konami's Castlevania video game series and the first Castlevania game to be released on the Nintendo DS. The game is the sequel to Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow and incorporates many elements from its predecessor. Dawn of Sorrow was commercially successful, selling more than 15,000 units in its first week in Japan and 164,000 units in the United States three months after its initial release.[3][4] Dawn of Sorrow continues the story of Aria of Sorrow, in which Dracula has been completely defeated, and his powers assumed by his reincarnation, Soma Cruz. With the help of his allies, Soma avoids becoming the new dark lord. A cult forms to bring forth a new dark lord by killing Soma. Soma and his allies move to ensure that a new dark lord is not created. Dawn of Sorrow incorporates many features from previous Castlevania games: the combination of elements from platform games and role-playing video games, the "Tactical Soul" system featured in Aria of Sorrow, and a dark, gothic atmosphere.[5][6] Dawn of Sorrow also introduces new gameplay elements, such as the "Magic Seal" system, which requires the use of the DS stylus to draw a pattern in order to defeat powerful enemies,[5] a distinctive anime character design,[7] and a multiplayer mode, where two players compete for fastest times on a prerendered level.[6] The game received high scores from many video game publications, and was considered one of the best games on the Nintendo DS for 2005. The game was re-released in Japan on June 29, 2006 and later in North America during 2007 as part of the "Konami the Best" line.[1] Submitter klopjero Submitted 04/06/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  4. Nintendo DS - Akumajou Dracula Ubawareta Kokuin (Japan)-klopjero(20170402) View File Castlevania: Order of Ecclesia, known in Japan as Akumajō Dracula: Ubawareta Kokuin (悪魔城ドラキュラ 奪われた刻印?, lit. Devil's Castle Dracula: The Stolen Seal),[5] is a platform-adventure game and the third Nintendo DS installment of the Castlevania franchise. Directed by Akihiro Minakata, with long time producer Koji Igarashi returning. The plot involves Shanoa, who is part of an organization set to defeat Dracula after the Belmont clan has vanished. Database entry: <game name="Akumajou Dracula Ubawareta Kokuin (Japan)" index="true" image="A"> <description>Akumajou Dracula Ubawareta Kokuin</description> <cloneof></cloneof> <crc></crc> <manufacturer></manufacturer> <year></year> <genre></genre> <rating>Other - NR (Not Rated)</rating> <enabled>Yes</enabled> </game> Submitter klopjero Submitted 04/06/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  5. Nintendo DS - Castlevania - Order of Ecclesia (USA) (En,Fr)-klopjero(20170402) View File Castlevania: Order of Ecclesia, known in Japan as Akumajō Dracula: Ubawareta Kokuin (悪魔城ドラキュラ 奪われた刻印?, lit. Devil's Castle Dracula: The Stolen Seal),[5] is a platform-adventure game and the third Nintendo DS installment of the Castlevania franchise. Directed by Akihiro Minakata, with long time producer Koji Igarashi returning. The plot involves Shanoa, who is part of an organization set to defeat Dracula after the Belmont clan has vanished. Submitter klopjero Submitted 04/06/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  6. Akumajou Special - Boku Dracula-kun (Japan) (Translated En) View File Akumajou Special - Boku Dracula-kun (Japan) (Translated En) Akumajō Special: Boku Dracula-kun (悪魔城すぺしゃる ぼくドラキュラくん Akumajō Supesharu: Boku Dorakyura-kun?, lit. "Demon Castle Special: I'm Kid Dracula") is a platformer video game made by Konami. It was released only in Japan for the Famicom on 19 October 1990.[1] The game was never localized outside Japan until a fan created translation was released in 2003. It is considered a parody of the Castlevania series. A version for mobile phones was also released on 30 June 2006 in Japan only. Easter Egg At the title screen, entering the Konami Code (Up, Up, Down, Down, Left, Right, Left, Right, B, A) will give a tone for correct code entry. Pressing Start, however, gives you nothing more than a mocking message. Japanese English ざんねんでした。 なにもないよ~ん! Too bad. There's nothing here! The program code were intended to have more than one cheat codes at once, but there is only one cheat entry left in the pointer table for the cheats, the rest is removed at some point. However, some coding for at least one more additional cheat flag exist in the game. Code PAVLSYAA will replace the easter cheat effect with the scrapped unused one, which will gives to you extra 50 lives instead at the start of the new game. Submitter klopjero Submitted 03/27/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  7. Nintendo DS - Akumajou Dracula - Gallery of Labyrinth (Japan) View File Nintendo DS - Akumajou Dracula - Gallery of Labyrinth (Japan) Database: <game name="Akumajou Dracula - Gallery of Labyrinth (Japan)" index="" image=""> <description>Akumajou Dracula - Gallery of Labyrinth</description> <cloneof></cloneof> <crc></crc> <manufacturer>Konami</manufacturer> <year>2006</year> <genre></genre> <rating>Other - NR (Not Rated)</rating> <enabled>Yes</enabled> ----------- Castlevania: Portrait of Ruin, known in Japan as Akumajō Dracula: Gallery of Labyrinth (悪魔城ドラキュラ ギャラリー・オブ・ラビリンス?, translated Devil's Castle Dracula: Gallery of Labyrinth),[4] is a platform-adventure game developed and published by Konami.[3] The game was released on November 16, 2006 in Japan, and in the US on December 5, 2006 for the Nintendo DS handheld game console.[5] Portrait of Ruin is the first Castlevania to feature a cooperative multiplayer gameplay mode and the first handheld Castlevania to have English voice-overs, outside of its original Japanese release. Portrait of Ruin is set in 1944 Europe during World War II,[6] and is a continuation of the story from Castlevania: Bloodlines.[7] The game introduces new protagonists and antagonists to the Castlevania series as well as expand on the two character gameplay found in the previous Nintendo DS Castlevania title, Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow. Portrait of Ruin has met with an overall positive critical response and has received high ratings from reviews, along with several awards. Regional Differences Typos US Europe Richter's name was spelled as "RICHITER" on the Japanese and US versions' file select screen (Due to an apparently miss in Japanese-English spelling conversion). This was corrected in the European version, and Japanese revision (NDS-6081). US Europe Charlotte's name was missing an L on the Equip screen (also because Japanese-English spelling transition cases). This was also fixed in the European version and later Japanese revision. Glitch Fixes There are several glitches and exploits in Portrait of Ruin in other countries that that got fixed for the European release, and Japanese revision (NDS-6081). Item duplication exploit for Eric's Quest rewards no longer work. Players are no longer able to skip Eric's congratulatory line about finishing the quest with the Start button. Somewhat a hidden (and possibly accidental) staple since Symphony of the Night, players are no longer able to glitch out of the roofs in the Great Stairways. A glitch involving being locked in Death's room after beating and skipping the boss' dialogue was also fixed. Finally, there is an exploitable glitch about carrying over progress (all, including stats, map and even the same save point) to a new level-cap game which unsurprisingly gets fixed as well. Submitter klopjero Submitted 03/18/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  8. Nintendo DS - Castlevania - Portrait of Ruin (USA)-klopjero View File Castlevania: Portrait of Ruin, known in Japan as Akumajō Dracula: Gallery of Labyrinth (悪魔城ドラキュラ ギャラリー・オブ・ラビリンス?, translated Devil's Castle Dracula: Gallery of Labyrinth),[4] is a platform-adventure game developed and published by Konami.[3] The game was released on November 16, 2006 in Japan, and in the US on December 5, 2006 for the Nintendo DS handheld game console.[5] Portrait of Ruin is the first Castlevania to feature a cooperative multiplayer gameplay mode and the first handheld Castlevania to have English voice-overs, outside of its original Japanese release. Portrait of Ruin is set in 1944 Europe during World War II,[6] and is a continuation of the story from Castlevania: Bloodlines.[7] The game introduces new protagonists and antagonists to the Castlevania series as well as expand on the two character gameplay found in the previous Nintendo DS Castlevania title, Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow. Portrait of Ruin has met with an overall positive critical response and has received high ratings from reviews, along with several awards. Submitter klopjero Submitted 03/18/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  9. Nintendo Gameboy - Dracula Densetsu II (Japan)-klopjero(20170316) View File Nintendo Gameboy - Dracula Densetsu II (Japan)-klopjero(20170316) Castlevania II: Belmont's Revenge, known as Dracula Densetsu II (ドラキュラ伝説II?, officially translated The Legend of Dracula II)[1] in Japan, is a platform game released for the Game Boy in 1991. It is the second Castlevania title for the Game Boy and serves as a sequel to the previous title, Castlevania: The Adventure. Belmont's Revenge is included in color in the fourth volume of the Konami GB Collection compilations.[2] Set fifteen years after the events of Castlevania: The Adventure, Dracula returns and kidnaps Christopher Belmont's son Soleiyu at his coming of age feast, and turns him into a demon. With Soleiyu's mystical powers, Dracula retakes human form and rebuilds his castle, forcing Christopher to confront Dracula once again to save his son and Transylvania.[3][4] Regional Changes Sound Test Titles As seen above, the track titles were changed to generic names in the overseas releases, likely done to remove their religious references. Japan US Info NEW MESSIAH BGM 1 Crystal Castle PRAYING HANDS BGM 2 Cloud Castle RIPE SEEDS BGM 3 Plant Castle PSYCO WARRIOR BGM 4 Rock Castle ORIGINAL SIN BGM 5 Dracula Castle 1 PASSPIED BGM 6 Dracula Castle 2-1 EVIL GODS BOSS 1 Regular boss C.PHANTASIE BOSS 2 Dracula Castle 2 boss SONS OF SATAN BOSS 3 Final boss SOLEIYU DEMO 1 Dracula Castle map FAITH DEMO 2 Dialogue NEW CHURCH SELECT BGM Stage select Weapons Japan US While both regions of the game share the Holy Water, the other weapon is different in each. The Japanese version offers a boomerang, but the US version has the axe, either because it was more useful or less broken. Submitter klopjero Submitted 03/16/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  10. Sega Mega Drive - Castlevania - The New Generation (Europe)-klopjero View File Sega Mega Drive - Castlevania - The New Generation (Europe)-klopjero Castlevania: Bloodlines, known as Vampire Killer[a] in Japan and as Castlevania: The New Generation in PAL regions, is a platform game developed and published by Konami for the Sega Genesis, released worldwide in March 1994. It was the only Castlevania video game released on the Genesis. The game's storyline concerns a legendary vampire named Elizabeth Bartley who is Dracula's niece, suddenly appearing in the 20th century. Plotting a sacrificial war in order to bring her uncle back to life, she orchestrates the beginning of World War I. Quincy Morris' son, John, and his best friend Eric Lecarde, vow to take up the fight against evil. Together they manage to prevent Dracula's full resurrection. Unlike most Castlevania games, Bloodlines was the first game in the series that does not take place exclusively in Dracula's castle, with most levels taking place throughout Europe. Regional Differences Title Screen Japan US Europe The Japanese title, strangely, is not some variant on Akumajou Dracula but instead simply Vampire Killer. The censorship of blood in the European version extended to the title, and not only graphically, as the game is called Castlevania: The New Generation. Characters Japan US/Europe Eric Lecarde's face was significantly less masculine looking in the Japanese version's introduction and Expert ending. US/Europe Japan John Morris is called Johnny Morris in the Japanese version. Passwords The Japanese version handles passwords differently - instead of showing passwords in between levels, in the Japanese version passwords are shown after the End option is chosen on the game over screen. Blood Blood has been removed from the European version in various ways: US/Japan Europe The dead zombie outside of Castle Dracula, which some crows are feeding on, was removed in the European version. US/Japan Europe The zombies were changed from pink with red blood to a greenish blue with green blood in the European version. US/Japan Europe Hung corpses and blood dripping from the platforms of Stage 1 and Stage 6-2 were removed entirely in the European version as well. US/Japan Europe Due to the aforementioned objection to blood itself (again!), the blood fountain in Stage 5-1 was changed to a boring regular fountain when walking past it. The Blood Skeleton surprisingly survived the censorship. US/Japan Europe Eric no longer get impaled when he dies in the European version. Submitter klopjero Submitted 03/12/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  11. Sega Mega Drive - Akumajou Dracula - Vampire Killer (Japan)-klopjero View File Sega Mega Drive - Akumajou Dracula - Vampire Killer (Japan)-klopjero Castlevania: Bloodlines, known as Vampire Killer[a] in Japan and as Castlevania: The New Generation in PAL regions, is a platform game developed and published by Konami for the Sega Genesis, released worldwide in March 1994. It was the only Castlevania video game released on the Genesis. The game's storyline concerns a legendary vampire named Elizabeth Bartley who is Dracula's niece, suddenly appearing in the 20th century. Plotting a sacrificial war in order to bring her uncle back to life, she orchestrates the beginning of World War I. Quincy Morris' son, John, and his best friend Eric Lecarde, vow to take up the fight against evil. Together they manage to prevent Dracula's full resurrection. Unlike most Castlevania games, Bloodlines was the first game in the series that does not take place exclusively in Dracula's castle, with most levels taking place throughout Europe. Regional Differences Title Screen Japan US Europe The Japanese title, strangely, is not some variant on Akumajou Dracula but instead simply Vampire Killer. The censorship of blood in the European version extended to the title, and not only graphically, as the game is called Castlevania: The New Generation. Characters Japan US/Europe Eric Lecarde's face was significantly less masculine looking in the Japanese version's introduction and Expert ending. US/Europe Japan John Morris is called Johnny Morris in the Japanese version. Passwords The Japanese version handles passwords differently - instead of showing passwords in between levels, in the Japanese version passwords are shown after the End option is chosen on the game over screen. Blood Blood has been removed from the European version in various ways: US/Japan Europe The dead zombie outside of Castle Dracula, which some crows are feeding on, was removed in the European version. US/Japan Europe The zombies were changed from pink with red blood to a greenish blue with green blood in the European version. US/Japan Europe Hung corpses and blood dripping from the platforms of Stage 1 and Stage 6-2 were removed entirely in the European version as well. US/Japan Europe Due to the aforementioned objection to blood itself (again!), the blood fountain in Stage 5-1 was changed to a boring regular fountain when walking past it. The Blood Skeleton surprisingly survived the censorship. US/Japan Europe Eric no longer get impaled when he dies in the European version. Submitter klopjero Submitted 03/12/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  12. Nintendo Gameboy - Akumajou Dracula - Shikkoku Taru Zensoukyoku - Dark Night Prelude (Japan)-klopjero View File Castlevania Legends, released in Japan as Akumajō Dracula: Dark Night Prelude (悪魔城ドラキュラ 漆黒たる前奏曲ダークナイト プレリュード Akumajō Dorakyura Dāku Naito Pureryūdo?) is the third and final Castlevania title released for the original Game Boy. It was released in Japan on November 27, 1997 and in North America on March 11, 1998. As with many Game Boy titles after 1994, Legends has some enhancements when played on the Super Game Boy. Click here for US/European version Submitter klopjero Submitted 03/11/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  13. Nintendo Gameboy - Castlevania Legends (USA, Europe)-klopjero View File Castlevania Legends, released in Japan as Akumajō Dracula: Dark Night Prelude (悪魔城ドラキュラ 漆黒たる前奏曲ダークナイト プレリュード Akumajō Dorakyura Dāku Naito Pureryūdo?) is the third and final Castlevania title released for the original Game Boy. It was released in Japan on November 27, 1997 and in North America on March 11, 1998. As with many Game Boy titles after 1994, Legends has some enhancements when played on the Super Game Boy. Submitter klopjero Submitted 03/11/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  14. Nintendo Famicom - Akumajou Densetsu (Japan)-klopjero View File Nintendo Famicom - Akumajou Densetsu (Japan)-klopjero Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse, known in Japan as Akumajō Densetsu (悪魔城伝説?, literally Devil's Castle Legend),[2] is the third and final Castlevania video game produced for the Nintendo Entertainment System. It was published by Konami in Japan in 1989, in North America in 1990, and in Europe in 1992 (some time after the European release of Super Castlevania IV). It was later released on the Wii Virtual Console in the PAL regions on October 31, 2008, in North America on January 12, 2009 and in Japan on April 21, 2009. The plot of Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse is a prequel to the original Castlevania (much like the earlier Game Boy game Castlevania: The Adventure) set a few centuries before the events of the original game. The game's protagonist is Trevor C. Belmont, an ancestor of the original hero Simon Belmont. Regional Differences Castlevania III managed to slip a lot of religious imagery under Nintendo's radar, but all of the game's nudity has been censored. Some graphics and palettes have also been improved. Akumajou Densetsu Castlevania III The nude statues seen on the name entry screen and password screen have been given dresses and their shading has been updated. The vines that were originally on the statues were removed. Castlevania III also uses a much more stylish font than Akumajou Densetsu. Amusingly, the opposite went on to happen in Castlevania IV. Akumajou Densetsu Castlevania III The same also applies to the nude statues at Block 8-01 in Dracula's Curse. Akumajou Densetsu Castlevania III The cross in the intro scene originally had a "glowing" effect surrounding it, which was removed in Castlevania III. Akumajou Densetsu Castlevania III Medusa lost her female characteristics in Dracula's Curse. Akumajou Densetsu Castlevania III Besides the breast reduction, the completely messed up animation frame for her aiming upward stance was cleaned up. Still, three of her animation frames were less than perfect. Her head looks suspiciously mispositioned in one of her aiming straight ahead frames. A few Medusa-tiles went unused in the Japanese ROM, an arm meant for the glitchy animation frame. And a different part of the body found in both ROMs, meant for this frame: Submitter klopjero Submitted 03/11/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  15. Super Famicom - Akumajou Dracula (Japan)-klopjero View File Akumajou Dracula (Japan) Super Castlevania IV (Japanese: 悪魔城ドラキュラ Hepburn: Akumajō Dorakyura?, Devil's Castle Dracula[2]) is a platform game developed and published by Konami and the first Castlevania game for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System. The game was originally released in 1991 and later re-released on the Virtual Console in 2006 for the Wii,[3] in 2013 for the Wii U, and in 2016 for the New Nintendo 3DS.[4] It features expanded play control, 16-bit graphics featuring SNES Mode 7, and a soundtrack featuring brand new pieces and arrangements based on previous Castlevania music. Following the same setting as Castlevania on the NES, the game takes place in 1691 Transylvania, where the vampire hunter Simon Belmont must defeat the vampire Dracula.[3][5] Submitter klopjero Submitted 03/07/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  16. Super Nintendo Entertainment System - Super Castlevania IV (USA)-klopjero View File Super Castlevania IV (Japanese: 悪魔城ドラキュラ Hepburn: Akumajō Dorakyura?, Devil's Castle Dracula[2]) is a platform game developed and published by Konami and the first Castlevania game for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System. The game was originally released in 1991 and later re-released on the Virtual Console in 2006 for the Wii,[3] in 2013 for the Wii U, and in 2016 for the New Nintendo 3DS.[4] It features expanded play control, 16-bit graphics featuring SNES Mode 7, and a soundtrack featuring brand new pieces and arrangements based on previous Castlevania music. Following the same setting as Castlevania on the NES, the game takes place in 1691 Transylvania, where the vampire hunter Simon Belmont must defeat the vampire Dracula.[3][5] Submitter klopjero Submitted 03/06/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  17. Super Nintendo Entertainment System - Castlevania - Dracula X (USA)-klopjero View File Castlevania: Dracula X, known as Akumajou Dracula XX (悪魔城ドラキュラXX Akumajō Dorakyura XX?) in Japan and Castlevania: Vampire's Kiss in Europe,[27] was developed for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System.[3] While the plot is similar to Rondo of Blood and it uses many of the latter's graphics, it featured a different art style, redesigned levels, and altered gameplay elements (such as having only two alternate levels and Maria as a nonplayable character).[3][22][28] It was released on July 21, 1995 in Japan, in September 1995 in the USA and Europe,[27] and on June 22, 1996 in Australia as an uncensored release.[citation needed] The game was also released as a Wii U Virtual Console download in Japan on April 23, 2014, in North America on October 2, 2014 and the PAL regions on November 13, 2014. A version for the New Nintendo 3DS was released in North America on December 29, 2016, and in Europe and Australia on January 26, 2017. Submitter klopjero Submitted 03/06/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  18. Sony PSP - Akumajou Dracula - X Chronicle (Japan)-klopjero View File Castlevania: The Dracula X Chronicles, known in Japan as Akumajō Dracula X Chronicle (悪魔城ドラキュラ Xクロニクル Akumajō Dorakyura Ekkusu Kuronikuru?, lit. "Devil's Castle Dracula X Chronicle")[29] is a 2.5D remake of Rondo of Blood for the PlayStation Portable.[8] It includes the original game and a port of its sequel, Symphony of the Night, as unlockable content.[1] Symphony of the Night includes the option to play as Maria (as did the Sega Saturn version, but based on the Rondo of Blood version), as well as redone scripts, sound effects and new voice acting.[30] Gameplay in The Dracula X Chronicles remains largely unchanged from Rondo of Blood.[31] However, a Boss Rush mode was added; completion of it three times unlocks the mini-game Peke.[32] It was released in North America on October 23, 2007, in Japan on November 8, 2007, in Europe on February 15, 2008 and in Australia & New Zealand on April 9, 2008.[33] In 2008, the North American edition was re-released as part of the "Greatest Hits" label while the Japanese edition was re-released on July 15, 2010 under the "Best Selection" label.[33] The game was added to the PlayStation Network in Europe in June 2014, as a PSP-only release (the game is already compatible with the PS Vita).[34] Submitter klopjero Submitted 03/05/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  19. Akumajou Dracula (Japan)-klopjero(20170303) View File Castlevania, known in Japan as Akumajou Dracula (悪魔城ドラキュラ Akumajō Dorakyura?, officially translated Devil's Castle Dracula),[6] is an action-platformer video game developed and published by Konami for the Family Computer Disk System video game console in Japan in September 1986. It was ported to cartridge format and released in North America for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) in May 1987 followed by a European release in 1988. The game takes place in the year 1691 where players control Simon Belmont who is tasked with defeating the vampire Dracula. It was re-released for the Family Computer (FC) in cartridge format in 1993. It is the first game in Konami's Castlevania video game series; it was followed by two more NES games titled Castlevania II: Simon's Quest (released for the NES in 1988) and Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse (1989). A fourth game, retelling the events of the original, was released for the Super NES and titled Super Castlevania IV. Castlevania was positively received and financially successful. It is considered an NES classic by PC World, while Nintendo Power and Game Informer ranked it in their best video games list (at 22 and 48 respectively). IGN ranked it 19 among their favourite NES games. Submitter klopjero Submitted 03/03/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  20. Microsoft MSX2 - Vampire Killer (Japan)-klopjero(20170303) View File Vampire Killer, known as Akumajō Dracula (悪魔城ドラキュラ?, officially translated Devil's Castle Dracula)[1] in Japan, is a platform-adventure game produced by Konami and released in 1986 for the MSX2 computer platform in Japan and Europe.[2] It was in development around the same time as the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) game Castlevania, which shares the same title in Japan.[3] The MSX2 version of Akumajō Dracula was released in Japan on October 30, 1986,[4] a month following the NES version,[5] making it the second game in the Castlevania series. It was the first Castlevania game released in Europe. It was never released in North America. In contrast to the more traditional platform gameplay of the NES Castlevania, the MSX Vampire Killer was instead a more open-ended platform game.[3]The game's non-linear design had a similar structure to Metroid released that same year.[6] The game laid the foundations for the open-ended action-adventure platform gameplay later seen in the 1987 title Castlevania II: Simon's Quest, 1997 title Castlevania: Symphony of the Night, and most 2D Castlevania games following it.[7] Submitter klopjero Submitted 03/03/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  21. Castlevania III - Dracula's Curse (USA)-klopjero View File Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse, known in Japan as Akumajō Densetsu (悪魔城伝説?, literally Devil's Castle Legend),[2] is the third and final Castlevania video game produced for the Nintendo Entertainment System. It was published by Konami in Japan in 1989, in North America in 1990, and in Europe in 1992 (some time after the European release of Super Castlevania IV). It was later released on the Wii Virtual Console in the PAL regions on October 31, 2008, in North America on January 12, 2009 and in Japan on April 21, 2009. The plot of Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse is a prequel to the original Castlevania (much like the earlier Game Boy game Castlevania: The Adventure) set a few centuries before the events of the original game. The game's protagonist is Trevor C. Belmont, an ancestor of the original hero Simon Belmont. Submitter klopjero Submitted 03/03/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  22. Nintendo Gameboy - Dracula Densetsu (Japan)-klopjero(20170301) View File I re-used your theme again Jsinn, because, you know..it's so frekin awesome. Castlevania: The Adventure, known as Dracula Densetsu (ドラキュラ伝説 Dorakyura Densetsu?, lit. The Legend of Dracula[2]) in Japan, is a platform game released for the Game Boy in 1989. It is the first Castlevania title for the system. Castlevania: The Adventure was re-released in color as part of the Konami GB Collection compilations in Japan and Europe. A remake titled Castlevania: The Adventure ReBirth was released as a WiiWare game for the Wii. Submitter klopjero Submitted 03/01/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  23. Castlevania - Harmony of Dissonance (USA)-klopjero View File Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance, known in Japan as Castlevania: Byakuya no Concerto (キャッスルヴァニア 白夜の協奏曲 Kyassuruvania Byakuya no Koncheruto?, officially translated Castlevania: Concerto of Midnight Sun),[1][2] is a platform-adventure video game developed and published by Konami for the Game Boy Advance. Belonging to Konami's Castlevania video game series, it is the second installment of the series on the Game Boy Advance. It was released in Japan in June 2002, in North America in September 2002, and in Europe in October 2002. It was the first Castlevania game to be called "Castlevania" in Japan instead of "Akumajō Dracula". Harmony of Dissonance occurs in the fictional universe of the Castlevania series; the premise of the series centers on the eternal conflict between the vampire hunters of the Belmont clan and the immortal vampire Dracula. Set fifty years after Simon Belmont vanquished Dracula's curse, Harmony of Dissonance focuses on his grandson Juste Belmont and his quest to rescue a kidnapped childhood friend. Koji Igarashi produced Harmony of Dissonance with the intent of "creat[ing] a game that was similar to Castlevania: Symphony of the Night", the critically acclaimed PlayStation game that he had worked on.[3] Harmony of Dissonance sold 126,000 units in the United States and did not become a "huge hit in Japan".[3][4] Critics praised it as an entertaining game with improved graphics as compared to its predecessor Castlevania: Circle of the Moon, but criticized its soundtrack. In January 2006, Harmony of Dissonance was re-released in North America and later Europe, along with Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow, as part of the Castlevania Double Pack. Submitter klopjero Submitted 02/26/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  24. Sony Playstation - Castlevania Chronicle - Akumajou Dracula (Japan)-klopjero(20170226) View File Castlevania Chronicles, released in Japan as Castlevania Chronicle: Akumajō Dracula (悪魔城年代記キャッスルヴァニアクロニクル 悪魔城ドラキュラ Kyassuruvania Kuronikuru Akumajō Dorakyura?), is a platform video game developed by Konami for the PlayStation.[1] It is a port of a game originally released for the Sharp X68000 home computer in 1993 as simply Akumajō Dracula (悪魔城ドラキュラ Akumajō Dorakyura?, "Devil's Castle Dracula").[2] This Castlevania Chronicles port adds a number of features, including an Arranged Mode for new players.[3][4] Much like Super Castlevania IV, Castlevania Chronicles is positioned as a remake of the original Castlevania for the Nintendo Entertainment System, where the vampire hunter Simon Belmont must defeat Dracula and save Transylvania. Submitter klopjero Submitted 02/26/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
  25. Sony Playstation - Castlevania Chronicles (USA)-klopjero(20170226) View File Castlevania Chronicles, released in Japan as Castlevania Chronicle: Akumajō Dracula (悪魔城年代記キャッスルヴァニアクロニクル 悪魔城ドラキュラ Kyassuruvania Kuronikuru Akumajō Dorakyura?), is a platform video game developed by Konami for the PlayStation.[1] It is a port of a game originally released for the Sharp X68000 home computer in 1993 as simply Akumajō Dracula (悪魔城ドラキュラ Akumajō Dorakyura?, "Devil's Castle Dracula").[2] This Castlevania Chronicles port adds a number of features, including an Arranged Mode for new players.[3][4] Much like Super Castlevania IV, Castlevania Chronicles is positioned as a remake of the original Castlevania for the Nintendo Entertainment System, where the vampire hunter Simon Belmont must defeat Dracula and save Transylvania. Submitter klopjero Submitted 02/26/2017 Category Themes (4:3) HyperBase Version Media Dimensions File Count Credits  
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