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sneak peak - my new cab... er...


SophT

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I am a bit confused as well. A detailed 'How-to' with pictures would be awesome!

If not, I am wondering how much one of you guys would charge to build me this:

- SNES controller

- Runs HyperSpin, NES, SNES, Atari 2600, Mame, and Sega Master System

- Plug n play to the HyperSpin menu

- Loaded with games and HS movies of my choice (if you have them)

or..

Same thing, loaded with no games (I can do it myself)

I would prefer to build it myself, as I enjoy this type of thing, but I am just not familiar with some of the hardware needed.

If the price is right, I'll send you the money via Paypal before you build/send it.

Edit: BTW, I have a SNES controller, a USB hub, about 15 old keyboards, wire, and a solder gun at the house already.

I also found one of these: img0436t.th.jpg

A 4 button NES controller might work out well for the games that I have in mind.

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Ok I'll see if I can break it down a little better:

basically I think you understand though - you are soldering a wire from the contact on the keyboard to the contact on the gamepad - so that pressing the gamepad button closes teh circuit on the keyboard (it's like an extension of the original keyboard key)

the 'matrix' is how the majority of keyboards are created. If you have one open it up and look:

you will see 3 thin plastic sheets. The top will have traces running horizontally and the bottom will have traces running vertically. The middle sheet will have holes where all the intersections are that keyboard keys exist. When you press a key on a keyboard is pushes the top and bottom sheet together closing the circuit and sending a keypress.

so the way to figure out the keys is to map the matrix. I do it by looking at the origin of the traces. It's usually like an 11x17 grid (which is 187 combinations)

so I get some wire and run a little app called keyhook (notepad will work too) and I touch x1 to y1 and write down the keypress registered. Then x1 to y2, y3, y4, etc... through

x11 y17. There will be a lot of [NULL] and <UNK> (187 possible inputs -108 standard keys)

then I look at my chart find the x coordinate and the y coordinate and solder them to the respective button on the PCB.

what jhabers was saying was if you could use say

x1, y3

x7, y3

x6, y3

etc...

instead of

x1, y9

x2, y5

x3, y4

you'll use less wires b/c Y will act as your common ground.

Anyways I used the numpad b/c the matrix was only 5x4 (20 possible inputs) and I only had to map out 12 keys - it's just less time consuming.

and some quick pictures;

ps2_matrix.jpg

kbse1c.gif

you get the idea...

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Ok, So you are saying that there are two seperate boards in a keyboard. One for the keyboard and one for the numpad. The numpad is easier to map the matrix because of less combinations. It is also easier to find the arrow keys and enter on the numpad matrix.

Once I have the buttons mapped out and wired to the NES pcb, the USB hub, and memory stick are pretty much a seperate thing.

I will take a good look at making this myself. Thanks.

How does HyperSpin/emulators autorun from the memory stick? I don't need to pre-configure anything on the pc? It just runs from that drive with no problem on any pc? What if it is picked up as a different drive letter?

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1) there's only one board in a keyboard (it inclueds the numpad). I actually bought a standalone USB numpad, so it only has 12 keys. like this:

Blue+numpad-unit.jpg

2) to make HyperSpin run from the memory-stick you'll need to write an autorun - it's really simple you create an 'inf' file (information) it's a simple driver that tells the computer what program to launch on 'autorun'. TO see an example try plugging in any cd that has an auto-run feature and open it in explorer you'll see an autorun.inf - open that with notepad and you can see how easy it is.

Just point your inf at hyperspin.exe

3) In order for it to be picked up as a different drive (F: on one computer E: on another...)

You'll need to open up HyperHQ and change to relative paths:

i.e.

.\HyperSpin\

instead of

E:\HyperSpin\

for emulator, roms, artwork, videos

and that's that.

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I just popped open the 4 button NES controller, and I am just not sure how the Turbo buttons worked. I am afraid that they may be routed to the original B and A buttons, but with some sort of pulse.

I really like the idea of the original NES controller, but I really need a 3rd and sometimes 4th button for certain MAME, and SNES games. I'd also like to have an 'esc' key on there somewhere.

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I just popped open the 4 button NES controller, and I am just not sure how the Turbo buttons worked. I am afraid that they may be routed to the original B and A buttons, but with some sort of pulse.

I really like the idea of the original NES controller, but I really need a 3rd and sometimes 4th button for certain MAME, and SNES games. I'd also like to have an 'esc' key on there somewhere.

Hey why dont you use a SNES controller then you'll have 6 buttons plus select/start that you can map for escape if you press both together.

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Hey why dont you use a SNES controller then you'll have 6 buttons plus select/start that you can map for escape if you press both together.

I had considered that earlier, and then I found this 4 button NES controller that I thought I could make it work. I really like the retro look of the original NES controller.

For what I want to do though, I think you're right. I'll go back to the orginal plan I think. There is more room in the SNES controller as well.

Edit: If it works out well, I'll probably make two of them. A retro NES one for NES, Atari, and Sega Master System, and a SNES one for SNES, Genesis, MAME, and such...

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well, conveniently or not, I have a PS3 SiXaxis controller that just stopped taking a charge. Not sure why it is not working, but I thought it would make a good gamepad for this purpose. Do any of you know anything about the analog sticks and buttons? Would there be anyway of getting those to work?

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  • 7 months later...
  • 1 year later...

I know this thread is a little old, but I bookmarked it a while back and finally found some free time to build one of these.

I was wondering if I could use a generic USB ps2 style PC controller, and have the autolaunch open a hyperlaunch script that would start Joy2Key and Hyperspin from the card reader when plugged in. That would eliminate the need to hack a keyboard and fit the pcb into the case because I could wire the controllers original cord into the USB hub. Any thoughts?

I would also be using a card reader and plan on making a slot in the case to change sd cards, so I could add systems.

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  • 1 year later...

I made one of these sans hyperspin before I found out hyperspin existed. It was just a SNES controller with a USB hub in it and a USB flash drive. I had already converted the SNES controller to USB with a RetroUSB kit.

In other words, I had the exact same scenario as you plan with the PC/USB PS2 knockoff controller and it worked fine. The only difference was I used Xpadder instead of Joy2Key so I didn't have to script anything (very helpful since I had no front end at all in my first attempt).

MY QUESTION is how do you handle the scenario of drive letter for the SD Card/Flash Drive? My HyperSpin HQ config has emulators/roms/media paths set up as "E:\HyperSpin\Emulators\NES\NESemu.exe" and such... If I plug this setup into another PC the flash media may show up as drive H:\ for example... Then HyperSpin wouldn't work at all...

How do you get around this??

Eric

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I made one of these sans hyperspin before I found out hyperspin existed. It was just a SNES controller with a USB hub in it and a USB flash drive. I had already converted the SNES controller to USB with a RetroUSB kit.

In other words, I had the exact same scenario as you plan with the PC/USB PS2 knockoff controller and it worked fine. The only difference was I used Xpadder instead of Joy2Key so I didn't have to script anything (very helpful since I had no front end at all in my first attempt).

MY QUESTION is how do you handle the scenario of drive letter for the SD Card/Flash Drive? My HyperSpin HQ config has emulators/roms/media paths set up as "E:\HyperSpin\Emulators\NES\NESemu.exe" and such... If I plug this setup into another PC the flash media may show up as drive H:\ for example... Then HyperSpin wouldn't work at all...

How do you get around this??

Eric

look at post #30 in this thread. it is explained there. that you change the paths to relative paths in hyperhq...

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  • 9 months later...

Well I know this is a very old post but first time I have seen it. I was wondering if anyone has tried making this with a Micro CPU The Rasberry PI Version of this has like 3 or 4 USB ports for more memory. The computer itself could be plugged into the back of the monitor or tv screen using the HDMI connection on the computer. Then get a wireless number pad like this one make the NES wireless and just plug the mo dual into the little computer since it has a built in USB HUB. Another good reason this might be worth a look if you take your NES controllers into where I work they will track it on the network for using an unauthorized USB device but since it connects to the HDMI theirs is no way to track it

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