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Virtual Pin Force Feedback using original flipper Coils


Miracle

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Hi Everyone,

Working on my Standard Size Virtual Pinball, i use a old Stern Galaxy.

I want to provide force feedback using the original flip coil (because i have a small budget and i think it's more "accurate" than a industrial relay).

Does someone allready heard about this ?

I don't have the original Stern alimentation, only a standard PC alimentation (12v, 5v).

Does is it ok to operate the coil ?

Thanks

Ced.

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  • 1 year later...

Going to need some more information on your coils and power supply to determine that. There are 2 basic calculations that you have to do.

To determine the power needed in watts you need to calculate P=I x E where P is the Power (watts), I is the Current (amps) and E is the Electromotive Force (Volts).

To determine the current in the above calculation (I) you need to use Ohm's Law where E=I x R, E once again being Voltage, I being Current and R being Resistance (ohms).

So we need to fill in the blanks:

If we want to find the current, we'll need to calculate the value of I from Ohm's Law which means we need to rearrange the formula like so:

I= E/R

Assuming that you are using a 48v power supply, to finish the formula we need the resistance of the coil in ohms: Then we would have:

I=48/?

Once we have I we can then use the calculation for power

P=IxE

Which would be :

P=?x48

That would give us the power needed for 1 coil, you then need to figure out how many coils may run at one time (Ptotal) and then add a safety margin of 25% or so to avoid blowing the power supply with a spike (the coils will have what is called an inrush current associated with them and will draw more power initially and then settle down).

So Ptotal would be PxNumCoils +25%

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Going to need some more information on your coils and power supply to determine that. There are 2 basic calculations that you have to do.

To determine the power needed in watts you need to calculate P=I x E where P is the Power (watts), I is the Current (amps) and E is the Electromotive Force (Volts).

To determine the current in the above calculation (I) you need to use Ohm's Law where E=I x R, E once again being Voltage, I being Current and R being Resistance (ohms).

So we need to fill in the blanks:

If we want to find the current, we'll need to calculate the value of I from Ohm's Law which means we need to rearrange the formula like so:

I= E/R

Assuming that you are using a 48v power supply, to finish the formula we need the resistance of the coil in ohms: Then we would have:

I=48/?

Once we have I we can then use the calculation for power

P=IxE

Which would be :

P=?x48

That would give us the power needed for 1 coil, you then need to figure out how many coils may run at one time (Ptotal) and then add a safety margin of 25% or so to avoid blowing the power supply with a spike (the coils will have what is called an inrush current associated with them and will draw more power initially and then settle down).

So Ptotal would be PxNumCoils +25%

Excellent example. Thanks.

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